Very Much Worth Seeing

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18 May 2008 06:22 #1109384264 by Rosemary
Replied by Rosemary on topic Re:Very Much Worth Seeing
Hello, everyone, I'm glad if my thoughts have been helpful. I hope those of you who are going will enjoy the play as much as I did!

By the way, there is a very good Thai restaurant [called The Thai Square] next to the theatre as well!

Rosemary

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18 May 2008 08:49 #1109384265 by AnitaDian
Replied by AnitaDian on topic Re:Very Much Worth Seeing
That was a brilliant review Rosemary, thank you, as it is pretty much what I wanted to say! I went to see Nat on Thursday night, and have to admit was wondering how on earth he would manage to play a character that is socially and physically uncomfortable. He was absolutley marvellous! As Rosemary said, it was difficult to watch him without wanting to laugh and cry at the same time! I just wanted to give him a hug!

As the webmistress said before, it was a very interesting beginning to the play that Nat was on stage when the audience arrived, and I nearly jumped out of my skin when his first words were "Hello Anita"!!

I would be very interested in what non British people thought of the whole premise of the play as the traits shown are very British I think. People putting a brave face/stiff upper lip on their lives even with people that they consider close friends.

Just so people know for parking, the play started at 8pm and didn't finish until nearly 11pm, so beware!

Anyway, thanks Nat for a wonderful evening, I think I will go again to Richmond as I am lucky enough to be so close!

Anitaxxxxx

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18 May 2008 16:22 #1109384267 by sweetlittlepixie
Replied by sweetlittlepixie on topic Parking for Windsor
AnitaDian wrote:

Just so people know for parking, the play started at 8pm and didn't finish until nearly 11pm, so beware!


And if you're willing to pay a rip-off £7.50 for four hours to park in Windsor even at that time of the night...

Otherwise if you don't mind a short walk I'd recommend parking in Eton across the river. They do have a small car park, which is much cheaper and the High Street restrictions only apply until 6pm I believe. (And there are several places to eat there too.)

Or better still, just along from Eton College you can park on-street for nothing - and get yourself a very pleasant 15 minute bit of gentle exercise into the bargain! B)

Pixie

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19 May 2008 13:22 #1109384273 by Rosemary
Replied by Rosemary on topic Re:Very Much Worth Seeing
Anita, that was a very acute observation about it being an extremely British play! I hadn't thought of that at all, but the moment I read your post I realized how right you are. I'll be very intrigued to see if it strikes non-British theatregoers in the same way as it did those of us who are from the UK...

Rosemary

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20 May 2008 07:20 #1109384288 by AnitaDian
Replied by AnitaDian on topic Re:Very Much Worth Seeing
Thank you Rosemary.

What do the non-UK based people that have seen the play think?

Anitaxxxxx

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20 May 2008 15:53 - 20 May 2008 15:58 #1109384292 by webmistress
Replied by webmistress on topic Re:Very Much Worth Seeing
AnitaDian wrote:

Thank you Rosemary.

What do the non-UK based people that have seen the play think?

Anitaxxxxx


Hi Anita...

well since I'm a completely non-UK here are my thoughts on the stiff upper lip mentality that's been displayed here. First of all, I think that it's very much a cliché to think that everyone from the UK is like that. At least my experiences are very much different. But yes, there is a tendency to keeping up appearances - but not just in the UK.

You know I think the problem in this play is that Quartermaine is especially a sad person because he *thinks* he's friends with his colleagues. That's why he acts accordingly while the others know that he actually isn't a friend. He's useful, he's nice, he's a bit - well... willing to do all to please all - ya know. To me it is a play about a man who really doesn't know how to live his life but also about the ones who rip him off. They actually do this quite cold-blooded, don't they? Do they ever pay him back in any sort of way??? This sort of drama isn't uniquely British.

Naturally the mannerisms are very British indeed. Sometimes I had the notion that I heard Jeeves and Wooster talking there: "I say I say". Surely there are perfectly British ways of not-talking to another while people are in the same room - rest assured Germans can do that quite perfectly as well in certain situations. Or hiding behind polite phrases. But this especially emphasizes the superficial relationship Quartermaine has with the others - and the others have in between themselves. It's not a particularly close knit team that we see here. Everyone's up to his own career, destiny - whatever. They fight they quarrel, even old lovers don't support themselves as they might do. It just seems to me that Quartermaine is the last one not to realize that your professional life doesn't necessarily have to do with your private/personal qualities. What's that he's saying: "It's no good being liked in the staff room when you cannot be a good teacher in the class room". Rightly so. Because in your pro life your abilities to do your job are the things that are required nowadays. No-one protects you just because you're the nice guy.

So to sum it up, I think that Quartermaine's Terms deals with a quite common trait of our time, but it does use cliché where it is useful. BTW, one question in return: Did you notice all the clichés that were used to describe the pupils, the Japanese, the Italian, the French and zhe Tschörmans as well??? What do you say about that, Anita??? Just curious. "I want something for my money.... " Te-he....

Cheers!

webmistress

"I don't know. I need help. I'm sorry. And something else. [...] I forgot it."
~ Armand Gamache

"If it looks like a duck, swims like a duck, and quacks like a duck, then it probably is a duck." A simplified version of Occam's razor.
Last edit: 20 May 2008 15:58 by webmistress.

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