I'm quite happy to pass on some fantastic first-hand news. It's so great to give Nat's fans an early warning indeed, especially for those who love to listen to his audio work this will be one of this year's highlights. Nat will soon be reading the male lead in a brand-new series of  Book At Bedtime, which is currently scheduled to be broadcast on August 10th 'til August 14th, 2009 each day from 22:45 - 23:00 (GMT) on BBC Radio 4. Samantha Bond and Nathaniel Parker read from the romantic novel by Patrick Gale.You can listen live via the website of Book At Bedtime or up to seven days after the broadcast via the Listen Now function. Make sure to heat up your gadgets.

The Whole Day Through is an empathetic analysis on obligations, missed opportunities, and the danger of ending up with the wrong person in a faked life. It's an impressive reflection of how minds and relationships work or rather don't work. Here's some more on what this radio play is all about:

 

 

When forty-something Laura Lewis is obliged to abandon a life of stylish independence in Paris to care for her elderly mother in Winchester, it seems all romantic opportunities have gone up in smoke. Then she runs into Ben, the great love of her student days and, as she only now dares admit, the emotional yardstick by which she has judged every man since.

Are they brave enough to take this second chance at the lasting happiness which fate has offered them? Or will they be defeated by the insidious need, instilled in childhood, to do the right thing? Both Laura and Ben have turned their lives upside down in order to care for relatives, she for her cranky, brilliant mother, he, for his gay younger brother who has Mosaic Down’s Syndrome.

The novel takes its structure from a high summer day in Laura’s life in her mother’s house, from a rude awakening to a late night nightcap in the garden after her mother has gone to bed. This progression through her day is interleaved with a parallel journey through Ben’s, as he copes with the complications of young Bobby’s late-flowering sexuality and the myriad half-truths told him by patients attending his venereology clinic. Only as the day progresses and the weather experienced by the characters sharply differs do we begin to wonder if all is what it seems.

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